Guidelines for authors

Basic guidelines

(i)         The intended target audience of the Handbook is a wide, interdis­ciplinary academic community covering the entire range of the humani­ties, and the social and cognitive sciences. Therefore, specialized knowledge should never be presupposed.

(ii)        The authors should pay particular attention to writing a state-of-the-art article about their topic. Although any summary presentation of a field necessarily involves taking a particu­lar point of view, and perhaps even noticing relations that have not previously been accounted for, it is important that authors keep reinterpre­tations and extensions of already existing proposals to a mini­mum. Similarly, detailed accounts of specific disputes should not receive more attention than is warranted by their relevance.

(iii)       The language of publication is English. This means that access to the information contained in the text should not require knowledge of other languages, as in the case of examples (to be accompanied by glosses and translations) and quotations (the original version of which may appear in a footnote).

(iv)       For the sake of overall coherence, extensive editing may take place. But all entries are published in the respective authors’ names. When several authors are working separately on different aspects of one entry, the final compila­tion of the article will be an editorial task. Still the final version of a contribution will have the go-ahead of all the authors involved before publication. If an already existing entry is updated or revised by another author, the names of both will appear as the authors of the entry – with a note to indicate the history of the writing of the entry.

 

Procedure

The typical production procedure will contain the following stages:

(i)         When approaching prospective authors, the editors will indicate the approximate boundaries of the solicited article by listing the related topics about which other authors have been asked to write.

(ii)        The first contribution expected of an author will sometimes be a general outline of his or her article (and a basic list of references). In this outline, authors may also indicate sub-areas which they feel should be dealt with by someone else.

(iii)       The editors will first evaluate the outlines (if any) in view of the overall coherence of the Handbook: the intention is to fill in gaps and eliminate redundancies as much as possible before the actual writing starts; at this stage, the editors may also draw the authors’ attention to some useful additional references. (They will also start looking for ‘secondary’ authors wherever necessary.)

(iv)       When the first manuscript version comes in, the editors of the Handbook will approach other experts in the field for referee state­ments of the entry in question; comments and evaluations by referees will be sent to the authors in the same manner as this is done by the editors of any refereeing journal.

 

Entry-specific guidelines

Since the different parts of the Handbook contain different types of entries, these are dealt with separately below. Note that the different parts mentioned below do not have to be presented in the order given.

 

Traditions

Authors who contribute entries on a specific pragmatics-related tradition, should attempt to deal at least with the following issues:

·         brief historical overview

·         main focus of interest

·         most important concepts (keeping in mind that the most important ones will get an entry of their own)

·         examples where needed

·         if only parts of the tradition are pragmatics-related, provide an overview of the tasks pragmatics may have within the tradition, and/or its possible relevance

·         brief mention of important scholars (note: some scholars may receive their own entry in the Handbook)

·         landmark publications/reference works

·         list most important abbreviations/notations/symbols that are current (- these will not be kept in the entry itself, but they may be inserted in a general list/index of abbrevia­tions and symbols).

 

Methods

Authors who contribute articles on methods should attempt to deal with at least the following issues:

·         the pragmatics-related field(s)/tradition(s)which the method is most commonly associated with

·         the most important concepts and procedures

·         possibly a short sample analysis

·         brief mention of important scholars (note: some scholars may receive their own entry in the Handbook)

·         landmark publications/reference works

·        list most important abbreviations/notations/symbols that are current (- these will not be kept in the entry itself, but they may be inserted in a general list/index of abbrevia­tions and symbols).

 

Topical entries

Bearing in mind that most phenomena can be studied either synchronically or diachronically, as well as from the perspective of language acquisition or adult usage, the starting point for each entry should typically be acquired synchrony (unless the topic itself dictates other­wise); wherever possible, each entry should in addition attempt to say something about acquisition­al and diachronical aspects.

   Similarly, most phenomena can be situated with reference to either the micro-context of direct verbal interaction, or a wider societal macro-level. Typically, the starting point for each entry should be the micro-level (unless the topic itself dictates otherwise); wherever possible each entry should in addition attempt to say something about the relevance of the topic in a macro-perspective.

In addition, topical entries should contain:

·        a clear statement of the area/topic

·        the most important concepts

·        landmark publications/reference works

·        examples of data and analyses

·        perspectives for future research

Preferred length: about 5,000 to 8,000 words.

 

Entries on Scholars

Contributions on major scholars need to have at least the following information:

·   a short intellectual biography of the scholar

·   her/his central tenets in linguistics

·   her/his importance to pragmatics and how her/his work has been received within pragmatics

·   (your) assessment or criticism

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